Boot DTK-Mac into recovery mode


Sak Wathanasin
 

Not really an Xcode question, but if anyone has done this, it'd be one of you guys.

Our app uses a KEXT (Fuse) to implement what is effectively a shared network vol on the desktop. And today, I tried to boot the DTK-mini into "recovery mode" to enable "reduced security" to allow it to load. All the info I have (the WWDC video & Google) say "hold the power key" as you boot. Well, we no longer have any keyboards with power keys, so I tried holding in the power button at the back of the DTK-mini, but all that does is to turn it off.

I know I'm being very stupid, but what am I missing? Is there a boot arg I can set in NVRAM to force it to boot into recovery mode?

Thanks
Sak


Alex Zavatone
 

On Sep 8, 2020, at 12:13 PM, Sak Wathanasin <sw@...> wrote:

Not really an Xcode question, but if anyone has done this, it'd be one of you guys.

Our app uses a KEXT (Fuse) to implement what is effectively a shared network vol on the desktop. And today, I tried to boot the DTK-mini into "recovery mode" to enable "reduced security" to allow it to load. All the info I have (the WWDC video & Google) say "hold the power key" as you boot. Well, we no longer have any keyboards with power keys, so I tried holding in the power button at the back of the DTK-mini, but all that does is to turn it off.

I know I'm being very stupid, but what am I missing? Is there a boot arg I can set in NVRAM to force it to boot into recovery mode?

Thanks
Sak






Sak Wathanasin
 



On 8 Sep 2020, at 18:15, Alex Zavatone via groups.io <zav@...> wrote:

Command (⌘)-R


Alas, not in "Big Sur" (macOS 11), which is what the DTK-minis run. I did try that out of desperation as well as using the "eject" button.



Alex Zavatone
 

Do any of the other options listed work?

Is there a forum for DTK minis?

What if you try to boot off of an external?

On Sep 8, 2020, at 12:18 PM, Sak Wathanasin <sw@...> wrote:



On 8 Sep 2020, at 18:15, Alex Zavatone via groups.io <zav@...> wrote:

Command (⌘)-R


Alas, not in "Big Sur" (macOS 11), which is what the DTK-minis run. I did try that out of desperation as well as using the "eject" button.




Jack Brindle
 

This would be an EFI function, not an OS function, especially since the OS is not running at the time. The Big Sur help docs still list Command-R as the combination to do this.
However, I seem to remember that holding the shift key on startup was a magic combination for the Apple Silicon systems. 

Hope this helps!
Jack


On Sep 8, 2020, at 10:21 AM, Alex Zavatone via groups.io <zav@...> wrote:

Do any of the other options listed work?

Is there a forum for DTK minis?

What if you try to boot off of an external?

On Sep 8, 2020, at 12:18 PM, Sak Wathanasin <sw@...> wrote:



On 8 Sep 2020, at 18:15, Alex Zavatone via groups.io <zav@...> wrote:

Command (⌘)-R


Alas, not in "Big Sur" (macOS 11), which is what the DTK-minis run. I did try that out of desperation as well as using the "eject" button.





Alex Zavatone
 

AHA!

Much like us old timers often need to remember, I forgot the process too.  Search google for the problem.  Well, I think that worked.


This has boot features and recovery.


Here’s hoping this helps!

Alex Zavatone


On Sep 8, 2020, at 12:37 PM, Jack Brindle via groups.io <jackbrindle@...> wrote:

This would be an EFI function, not an OS function, especially since the OS is not running at the time. The Big Sur help docs still list Command-R as the combination to do this.
However, I seem to remember that holding the shift key on startup was a magic combination for the Apple Silicon systems. 

Hope this helps!
Jack


On Sep 8, 2020, at 10:21 AM, Alex Zavatone via groups.io <zav@...> wrote:

Do any of the other options listed work?

Is there a forum for DTK minis?

What if you try to boot off of an external?

On Sep 8, 2020, at 12:18 PM, Sak Wathanasin <sw@...> wrote:



On 8 Sep 2020, at 18:15, Alex Zavatone via groups.io <zav@...> wrote:

Command (⌘)-R


Alas, not in "Big Sur" (macOS 11), which is what the DTK-minis run. I did try that out of desperation as well as using the "eject" button.






Sak Wathanasin
 



On 8 Sep 2020, at 18:37, Jack Brindle via groups.io <jackbrindle@...> wrote:

This would be an EFI function, not an OS function, especially since the OS is not running at the time. The Big Sur help docs still list Command-R as the combination to do this.

Yes, you're right - this is an Apple Silicon thing.

However, I seem to remember that holding the shift key on startup was a magic combination for the Apple Silicon systems. 

I'll give it a go... Unfortunately, it's a 300 km round-trip to the office, which is where the DTK is (we only have 1 & need to share it). 

The guy on the WWDC video talks about it, but doesn't actually show how it's done (though you'd think they leave cmd+R as an alternative for keyboards without power buttons).

Thanks
Sak



Alex Zavatone
 

For anyone with these DTK Macs, the boot overview starts at 15:54 in the following video.



It appears that press and hold the power button. 



On Sep 8, 2020, at 12:51 PM, Sak Wathanasin <sw@...> wrote:



On 8 Sep 2020, at 18:37, Jack Brindle via groups.io <jackbrindle@...> wrote:

This would be an EFI function, not an OS function, especially since the OS is not running at the time. The Big Sur help docs still list Command-R as the combination to do this.

Yes, you're right - this is an Apple Silicon thing.

However, I seem to remember that holding the shift key on startup was a magic combination for the Apple Silicon systems. 

I'll give it a go... Unfortunately, it's a 300 km round-trip to the office, which is where the DTK is (we only have 1 & need to share it). 

The guy on the WWDC video talks about it, but doesn't actually show how it's done (though you'd think they leave cmd+R as an alternative for keyboards without power buttons).

Thanks
Sak




St John, David R
 

The key is, you need to start from a powered off state (at least with the DTK).

 

So power off the DTK and then press and hold the power button until the Apple appears and then the new recovery UI will show up.

 

-Dave

 

From: <xcode@apple-dev.groups.io> on behalf of "Alex Zavatone via groups.io" <zav@...>
Reply-To: "xcode@apple-dev.groups.io" <xcode@apple-dev.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, September 8, 2020 at 2:06 PM
To: "xcode@apple-dev.groups.io" <xcode@apple-dev.groups.io>
Cc: Sak Wathanasin <sw@...>
Subject: Re: [xcode] Boot DTK-Mac into recovery mode

 

CAUTION:   This email originated from outside the organization. Do not click links or open attachments unless you recognize the sender and know the content is safe.

For anyone with these DTK Macs, the boot overview starts at 15:54 in the following video.

 

 

 

It appears that press and hold the power button. 

 



On Sep 8, 2020, at 12:51 PM, Sak Wathanasin <sw@...> wrote:

 

 



On 8 Sep 2020, at 18:37, Jack Brindle via groups.io <jackbrindle@...> wrote:

 

This would be an EFI function, not an OS function, especially since the OS is not running at the time. The Big Sur help docs still list Command-R as the combination to do this.

 

Yes, you're right - this is an Apple Silicon thing.



However, I seem to remember that holding the shift key on startup was a magic combination for the Apple Silicon systems. 

 

I'll give it a go... Unfortunately, it's a 300 km round-trip to the office, which is where the DTK is (we only have 1 & need to share it). 

 

The guy on the WWDC video talks about it, but doesn't actually show how it's done (though you'd think they leave cmd+R as an alternative for keyboards without power buttons).

 

Thanks

Sak

 

 

 


Sak Wathanasin
 



On 8 Sep 2020, at 19:26, St John, David R <david.stjohn@...> wrote:

The key is, you need to start from a powered off state (at least with the DTK).
 
So power off the DTK and then press and hold the power button until the Apple appears and then the new recovery UI will show up.

Ah so... I get that it's a prototype and there are still rough edges.

At least I don't have to wait until the moon is in the right phase.

Many, many thanks
Sak