Date   

Re: Installer pkg built with Xcode 12.2 won't open in macOS 10.10 and 10.11

Ben Kennedy
 

Hey Mark,

I can't speak to what might be the problem, but I've been reading about code signing and notarization recently in an effort to better understand how it all works at a lower level, so I'm interested in what you find out.

TN2206 (https://developer.apple.com/library/archive/technotes/tn2206/_index.html) makes reference to using the `check-signature` tool (https://developer.apple.com/download/more/?=SignatureCheck) to validate package signatures. Have you tried that? Does it report anything useful?

-ben

On 7 Dec 2020, at 8:57 am, Mark Allan <markjallan@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi all,

I have a script which Xcode runs as a post-action during the archive phase which takes my compiled app, and generates a signed .pkg installer file along with all the other elements of the app.

For the last few years this has worked fine, but for some reason I'm now unable to open the resulting pkg file on macOS 10.10 and 10.11. When I try to open the installer on the older OSes, I'm presented with the following error message:

Installer_signed.pkg can't be installed because its digital signature is invalid.
The package may have been corrupted or tampered with. Get a new copy of the package and try again.

The signature is valid and I can see this in macOS 11 and 10.15 when clicking the certificate icon in the upper right corner of the window, so I'm not sure what's going on.

Is anyone aware of any changes to pkgbuild and productbuild which might have caused this? The man pages don't reference anything new that might be relevant, so I'm stuck.

Thanks
Mark





Installer pkg built with Xcode 12.2 won't open in macOS 10.10 and 10.11

Mark Allan
 

Hi all,

I have a script which Xcode runs as a post-action during the archive phase which takes my compiled app, and generates a signed .pkg installer file along with all the other elements of the app.

For the last few years this has worked fine, but for some reason I'm now unable to open the resulting pkg file on macOS 10.10 and 10.11. When I try to open the installer on the older OSes, I'm presented with the following error message:

Installer_signed.pkg can't be installed because its digital signature is invalid.
The package may have been corrupted or tampered with. Get a new copy of the package and try again.

The signature is valid and I can see this in macOS 11 and 10.15 when clicking the certificate icon in the upper right corner of the window, so I'm not sure what's going on.

Is anyone aware of any changes to pkgbuild and productbuild which might have caused this? The man pages don't reference anything new that might be relevant, so I'm stuck.

Thanks
Mark


Re: How to interpret crash reason

dhoerl
 

The explanation on the crappy code is complex - but it has to do with code that scales a large image on background threads, then renders just a tiny piece of that. I think iOS gets overloaded - that code crashes my companies users occasionally, but I've never had it happen to me. So the image itself is fine, and a user who crashes may not get another crash for a long time, or never. Corrupted JPEG was a read herring. 

What I did want to share is that by breakpointing on the one C function that I saw allowed me to determine what piece of code was using that API - and it was just in one place!

David


Re: Stupid question for build schemes.

Chris Hanson
 

On Nov 12, 2020, at 12:40 PM, Alex Zavatone via groups.io <zav@...> wrote:

These things.  When you open a target’s Scheme editor, these term for all of the things on the left that the scheme can change the settings for.

The things in the pop-up in the toolbar are schemes and destinations, not targets.

Schemes have actions. The topmost action, “Build” is really more like a meta-action though—it lets you specify information that’s used by all the other actions.

  — Chris


Re: How to interpret crash reason

Alex Zavatone
 

Great!  Any idea what the underlying cause was?  Was it reproducible with certain images, colorspaces, etc?

On Nov 17, 2020, at 12:55 PM, dhoerl via groups.io <dhoerl@...> wrote:

Thanks to all who replied to this. The weird thing was that it only happens infrequently  - a user gets it then doesn't for a long time.

So I had an idea - breakpoint on FigPhotoJPEGCreateIOSurfaceFromJPEG - this is an Apple C function in the MediaToolbox. Now, I can at least see what code is using that method, and gee - it turns out to be a piece of code already flagged as buggy!

Just thought I'd share.

David


Re: How to interpret crash reason

dhoerl
 

Thanks to all who replied to this. The weird thing was that it only happens infrequently  - a user gets it then doesn't for a long time.

So I had an idea - breakpoint on FigPhotoJPEGCreateIOSurfaceFromJPEG - this is an Apple C function in the MediaToolbox. Now, I can at least see what code is using that method, and gee - it turns out to be a piece of code already flagged as buggy!

Just thought I'd share.

David


Re: NSTableView Issues

Peter Hudson
 

Thanks Quincey. 

On 14 Nov 2020, at 22:00, Quincey Morris <quinceymorris@...> wrote:

https://developer.apple.com/documentation/appkit/nstableview/3622475-style

Editorial comment: It’s really a good idea to watch WWDC videos each year, to be aware of changes like this.

On Nov 14, 2020, at 13:29 , Peter Hudson via groups.io <Peter.hudson@...> wrote:

xCode 11 on Catalina -  I set the background color of rows in my table view - the color goes right to the edge of the table view.

xCode 12.3 beta on Big Sur - I set the background color of rows in my table view - the system leaves a white margin down each side of the table view - about 3mm or so wide.

This is older code, hence using cells in the table not views.

I want the color in my table view rows to go right to the edge of the table.


Re: NSTableView Issues

Quincey Morris
 

https://developer.apple.com/documentation/appkit/nstableview/3622475-style

Editorial comment: It’s really a good idea to watch WWDC videos each year, to be aware of changes like this.

On Nov 14, 2020, at 13:29 , Peter Hudson via groups.io <Peter.hudson@...> wrote:

xCode 11 on Catalina -  I set the background color of rows in my table view - the color goes right to the edge of the table view.

xCode 12.3 beta on Big Sur - I set the background color of rows in my table view - the system leaves a white margin down each side of the table view - about 3mm or so wide.

This is older code, hence using cells in the table not views.

I want the color in my table view rows to go right to the edge of the table.


NSTableView Issues

Peter Hudson
 

Hi All

xCode 11 on Catalina - I set the background color of rows in my table view - the color goes right to the edge of the table view.

xCode 12.3 beta on Big Sur - I set the background color of rows in my table view - the system leaves a white margin down each side of the table view - about 3mm or so wide.

This is older code, hence using cells in the table not views.

I want the color in my table view rows to go right to the edge of the table.

Anybody seen this ? Anybody fixed it ?

Thanks in advance !

Peter


Re: Stupid question for build schemes.

Ben Kennedy
 

Perhaps "Build Actions"?

The "Product" menu after all has a submenu called "Perform Action" containing several of these (Run, Test, Profile).

b

On 12 Nov 2020, at 12:40 pm, Alex Zavatone via groups.io <zav=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:

These things. When you open a target’s Scheme editor, these term for all of the things on the left that the scheme can change the settings for.

<PastedGraphic-1.png>


I hope this helps.
Cheers,
Alex Zavatone



On Nov 12, 2020, at 2:33 PM, Fritz Anderson <anderson.fritz@gmail.com> wrote:

I'm easily confused. Therefore I should confuse everybody else. It doesn't help that I don't have the full thread before me.

My understanding is that someone wants to know terms for the Xcode build and execution contexts; but that can't be because well-defined terms are already there. Possibly what's wanted is to unpack the jargon. I'll offer what I know, in the hope it's relevant.

---

Schemes, build settings, and build configurations are different things. There's a potential confusion in the names, so some care is needed.

---

Build settings are options that configure the tools used in the build process. Each setting may be conditioned on platform, OS version, build configuration, etc. They may be set per-target or left to the last in a stack of defaults. They are held in the project file itself.

---

Build configurations are external files to inject a layer of build defaults. The canonical use is to provide a uniform build practice for a developer or organization. They reside in external files and are catalogued in the project file.

---

Schemes set the runtime environment for one target x platform configuration. The environment is set per-action (the verbs in the Product menu or the popup anchored at what people think of as the Run button). This includes the configuration to be injected into the settings.

The Build tab sets non-default dependencies. (Example, though defaulted: Test depends mot just on the selected product target but the corresponding test targets.)

With one exception I can think of, schemes have no effect on the deliverable product. Schemes set only the environment into which Xcode itself launches a target. The exception is that you can set the build configuration for the archived product.

affect targets only the runtime environment only when the ptoduct is launched by Xcode.

Schemes are kept in a directory tree in the project bundle, but are particular to (in short) one developer unless explicitly marked Shsred.

---

If you need to talk about these together, I'd go with "Xcode build and execution context," or reasonable subsets. I think all four nouns are necessary.

— F


Re: Stupid question for build schemes.

Alex Zavatone
 

These things.  When you open a target’s Scheme editor, these term for all of the things on the left that the scheme can change the settings for.



I hope this helps.
Cheers,
Alex Zavatone



On Nov 12, 2020, at 2:33 PM, Fritz Anderson <anderson.fritz@...> wrote:

I'm easily confused. Therefore I should confuse everybody else. It doesn't help that I don't have the full thread before me.

My understanding is that someone wants to know terms for the Xcode build and execution contexts; but that can't be because well-defined terms are already there. Possibly what's wanted is to unpack the jargon. I'll offer what I know, in the hope it's relevant.

---

Schemes, build settings, and build configurations  are different things. There's a potential confusion in the names, so some care is needed.

---

Build settings are options that configure the tools used in the build process. Each setting may be conditioned on platform, OS version, build configuration, etc. They may be set per-target or left to the last in a stack of defaults. They are held in the project file itself.

---

Build configurations are external files to inject a layer of build defaults. The canonical use is to provide a uniform build practice for a developer or organization. They reside in external files and are catalogued in the project file.

---

Schemes set the runtime environment for one target x platform configuration. The environment is set per-action (the verbs in the Product menu or the popup anchored at what people think of as the Run button). This includes the configuration to be injected into the settings.

The Build tab sets non-default dependencies. (Example, though defaulted: Test depends mot just on the selected product target but the corresponding test targets.)

With one exception I can think of, schemes have no effect on the deliverable product. Schemes set only the environment into which Xcode itself launches a target. The exception is that you can set the build configuration for the archived product.

affect targets only the runtime environment only when the ptoduct is launched by Xcode.

Schemes are kept in a directory tree in the project bundle, but are particular to (in short) one developer unless explicitly marked Shsred.

---

If you need to talk about these together, I'd go with "Xcode build and execution context," or reasonable subsets. I think all four nouns are necessary.

    — F



Re: Stupid question for build schemes.

Fritz Anderson
 

I'm easily confused. Therefore I should confuse everybody else. It doesn't help that I don't have the full thread before me.

My understanding is that someone wants to know terms for the Xcode build and execution contexts; but that can't be because well-defined terms are already there. Possibly what's wanted is to unpack the jargon. I'll offer what I know, in the hope it's relevant.

---

Schemes, build settings, and build configurations  are different things. There's a potential confusion in the names, so some care is needed.

---

Build settings are options that configure the tools used in the build process. Each setting may be conditioned on platform, OS version, build configuration, etc. They may be set per-target or left to the last in a stack of defaults. They are held in the project file itself.

---

Build configurations are external files to inject a layer of build defaults. The canonical use is to provide a uniform build practice for a developer or organization. They reside in external files and are catalogued in the project file.

---

Schemes set the runtime environment for one target x platform configuration. The environment is set per-action (the verbs in the Product menu or the popup anchored at what people think of as the Run button). This includes the configuration to be injected into the settings.

The Build tab sets non-default dependencies. (Example, though defaulted: Test depends mot just on the selected product target but the corresponding test targets.)

With one exception I can think of, schemes have no effect on the deliverable product. Schemes set only the environment into which Xcode itself launches a target. The exception is that you can set the build configuration for the archived product.

affect targets only the runtime environment only when the ptoduct is launched by Xcode.

Schemes are kept in a directory tree in the project bundle, but are particular to (in short) one developer unless explicitly marked Shsred.

---

If you need to talk about these together, I'd go with "Xcode build and execution context," or reasonable subsets. I think all four nouns are necessary.

    — F


Re: New Stupid Xcode question.

Jonathan Prescott
 

It’s part of the new Document Tabs functionality, if you want to read up on it. The old Tab system (now known as Window Tabs) is still there, and it can be useful using the two.
Jonathan

On Nov 12, 2020, at 2:39 PM, Alex Zavatone via groups.io <zav=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:

For the first time in my life, I have just seen text within the title of an Xcode editor tab that is italic in Xcode 12.x

Does anyone know why this is happening or what this means?

Thanks in advance.
Alex Zavatone




Re: New Stupid Xcode question.

Jim Adams
 

It means the tab isn't permanent. Double click the tab to make it stay. Otherwise it will get re-used the next time you open a tab.

One thing I have noticed is that many times a tab becomes unresponsive, meaning clicking on it does not switch me to that file. I have to close the tab and open it again.

On 11/12/20, 2:39 PM, "xcode@apple-dev.groups.io on behalf of Alex Zavatone via groups.io" <xcode@apple-dev.groups.io on behalf of zav=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:

EXTERNAL

For the first time in my life, I have just seen text within the title of an Xcode editor tab that is italic in Xcode 12.x

Does anyone know why this is happening or what this means?

Thanks in advance.
Alex Zavatone


New Stupid Xcode question.

Alex Zavatone
 

For the first time in my life, I have just seen text within the title of an Xcode editor tab that is italic in Xcode 12.x

Does anyone know why this is happening or what this means?

Thanks in advance.
Alex Zavatone


Re: Stupid question for build schemes.

Alex Zavatone
 

Well, they are also all listed under the Product menu.  Build, Run, Test, Profile, Analyze and Archive.  It seems like we are performing an operation.  Build Mode Operation??¿¿ Like you, I want to be even go to the level of being pedantic about it, but it seems a little more than a mode.  

Anyway, whichever term we come up with or find out it is called, I’m cool with it.

Thanks much.
Alex Zavatone

On Nov 12, 2020, at 1:23 PM, Sandor Szatmari <admin.szatmari.net@...> wrote:



On Nov 12, 2020, at 14:17, Alex Zavatone via groups.io <zav@...> wrote:



On Nov 12, 2020, at 1:14 PM, Sandor Szatmari <admin.szatmari.net@...> wrote:



On Nov 12, 2020, at 13:59, Alex Zavatone via groups.io <zav@...> wrote:

In a build scheme, there are sections for Build, Run, Test, Archive, Profile, Analyze for each target.

What is the term for each of these?

Alex… don’t know if they have an official term.  Would calling them the Scheme’s ‘build modes’ offend anyone’s sensibilities?

Sandor

It’s a good start but is it a mode?  Or an operation?  But Build Operation is too vague.

I will advocate for mode, or more specifically, and pedantically, it is ‘the build mode in which the scheme is operating’…

Sandor

 

There needs to be some name for what those things are called.  We use them all too often for there not to be a term for them!




Re: Stupid question for build schemes.

Sandor Szatmari
 



On Nov 12, 2020, at 14:17, Alex Zavatone via groups.io <zav@...> wrote:



On Nov 12, 2020, at 1:14 PM, Sandor Szatmari <admin.szatmari.net@...> wrote:



On Nov 12, 2020, at 13:59, Alex Zavatone via groups.io <zav@...> wrote:

In a build scheme, there are sections for Build, Run, Test, Archive, Profile, Analyze for each target.

What is the term for each of these?

Alex… don’t know if they have an official term.  Would calling them the Scheme’s ‘build modes’ offend anyone’s sensibilities?

Sandor

It’s a good start but is it a mode?  Or an operation?  But Build Operation is too vague.

I will advocate for mode, or more specifically, and pedantically, it is ‘the build mode in which the scheme is operating’…

Sandor

 

There needs to be some name for what those things are called.  We use them all too often for there not to be a term for them!



Re: Stupid question for build schemes.

Alex Zavatone
 



On Nov 12, 2020, at 1:14 PM, Sandor Szatmari <admin.szatmari.net@...> wrote:



On Nov 12, 2020, at 13:59, Alex Zavatone via groups.io <zav@...> wrote:

In a build scheme, there are sections for Build, Run, Test, Archive, Profile, Analyze for each target.

What is the term for each of these?

Alex… don’t know if they have an official term.  Would calling them the Scheme’s ‘build modes’ offend anyone’s sensibilities?

Sandor

It’s a good start but is it a mode?  Or an operation?  But Build Operation is too vague.  

There needs to be some name for what those things are called.  We use them all too often for there not to be a term for them!



Re: Stupid question for build schemes.

Sandor Szatmari
 

On Nov 12, 2020, at 13:59, Alex Zavatone via groups.io <zav=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:

In a build scheme, there are sections for Build, Run, Test, Archive, Profile, Analyze for each target.

What is the term for each of these?
Alex… don’t know if they have an official term. Would calling them the Scheme’s ‘build modes’ offend anyone’s sensibilities?

Sandor

I’m trying to explain how to set up build configurations to someone and I’ve never been able to find out what Apple calls these.

Thanks.
Alex Zavatone




Stupid question for build schemes.

Alex Zavatone
 

In a build scheme, there are sections for Build, Run, Test, Archive, Profile, Analyze for each target.

What is the term for each of these? I’m trying to explain how to set up build configurations to someone and I’ve never been able to find out what Apple calls these.

Thanks.
Alex Zavatone

201 - 220 of 1436