Date   

Thanks!

Steve Mills
 

Hopefully these will be just as useful as all the lists.apple.com lists have been over the years. Mailing lists rule. Forums have their place, but tech help isn't it.

--
Steve Mills
Drummer, Mac geek


Re: Thanks!

Steve Mills
 

On Jun 6, 2017, at 22:24:11, Steve Mills <sjmills@mac.com> wrote:

Hopefully these will be just as useful as all the lists.apple.com lists have been over the years. Mailing lists rule. Forums have their place, but tech help isn't it.
One more thing: After all these years it's so great to have a list that *behaves correctly* and includes a reply-to back to the list instead of the stupid way Apple's lists have always worked.

--
Steve Mills
Drummer, Mac geek


app review process details

Taylor Arndt
 

App review process what is it like? How long does it take? I am asking
this because soon i will be an apple devoloper and i want to know the
ins and outs of this. I am under age, so i have to wate until July,
but i am trying to get some incite in to this.


Re: app review process details

Steve Mills
 

On Jun 7, 2017, at 08:35:58, Taylor Arndt <taylorarndt99@gmail.com> wrote:

App review process what is it like? How long does it take? I am asking
this because soon i will be an apple devoloper and i want to know the
ins and outs of this. I am under age, so i have to wate until July,
but i am trying to get some incite in to this.
Just read the docs. Apple provides a lot of good info about what to expect:

https://developer.apple.com/app-store/review/

There's also this site that should give you a fairly good idea about how long it takes for an app to get reviewed:

http://appreviewtimes.com

--
Steve Mills
Drummer, Mac geek


table view controlers and data populating

Taylor Arndt
 

Hi,
So i have a app and i am new at things with swift and all that but i
have created a table view and i am trying to get it to display data
from an array i used the methods for frow in index path and all those
methods but i can't get the data to show up in the cell i have created
in the table view controler.

--
Taylor


Xcode 9 impressions

 

So, Xcode 9! Here are my first impressions after a few days of using the beta.

I’m very impressed so far. The new editor is excellent — it’s super smooth and fast, even on some huge source files I work with that were sluggish before. It also does away with a lot of glitchiness I’d been experiencing, like random scrolling to the wrong place. I’ve found and reported a few regressions, like inability to turn off search wraparound, and ‘Use Selection For Replace’ not working.

Refactoring C++ is huge for me, because currently most of the code I’m writing is C++ or Obj-C++. The new refactoring UI is also very nice.

I have mixed feelings about the new Command-click behavior. It’s great to be able to access refactoring from the pop-up, but it does add an extra click to just jumping to the definition. You can use Ctrl-Command-click to skip that step, but it takes some effort to retrain my fingers to do that!

The undefined-behavior sanitizer and improved address sanitizer have already caught a few bugs in my code, including a tricky one involving using a pointer to a member of a C++ object after that object had left scope and been destructed. I have no idea what magic it used to detect that! On the downside, the UB sanitizer often causes my target executable to lock up when it finds the first issue, but I can work around it by just stopping it and running again.

All in all, I recommend downloading and using it.

—Jens


Re: table view controlers and data populating

 

Table views can definitely be tricky at first. But first, two things:

  • Questions about using frameworks like UIKit and AppKit are best posted on the ‘cocoa’ list. Following tradition, the ‘xcode’ list is about the Xcode IDE / compiler / tools themselves. Sorry if this sounds control-freaky, but in the past both lists have gotten busy and this helps to keep things focused.
  • When asking a Cocoa question make sure it’s clear what platform you’re asking about: from your post I can’t tell whether you’re making a Mac or iOS app, and table views work differently on each platform.

So could you repost on the cocoa list and put either UITableView or NSTableView in the subject? Thanks from your neighborhood control freak ;)

—Jens


Re: Xcode 9 impressions

Quincey Morris
 

On Jun 7, 2017, at 10:09 , Jens Alfke <jens@...> wrote:

I have mixed feelings about the new Command-click behavior. It’s great to be able to access refactoring from the pop-up, but it does add an extra click to just jumping to the definition. You can use Ctrl-Command-click to skip that step, but it takes some effort to retrain my fingers to do that!

Under Preferences -> Navigation there’s a checkbox to reverse Command-click and Control-Command-Click behavior.

I haven’t done a lot with Xcode 9 yet, but one thing:

— The WWDC event made it look like the new “fix-it” panel shows automatically, but it doesn’t. You still have to click on the damn icon at the start of the error message (though it’s marginally bigger now). Then, you can’t click on the fix-it any more, you have to click on the button at the *end* of the fixit. This is more mouse-fiddling than I’d like.



Re: Xcode 9 impressions

Jack Brindle
 

So far Xcode 9 has one major flaw that must be corrected - for mac OS apps, it appears that Apple has removed the ability to create projects with xibs, instead only allowing Storyboards.
In other words, they removed the “Use Storyboards” checkbox in the project creation dialog. This might be just fine for iOS, but not for macOS where we still use xibs extensively. There may
be a preference somewhere that reinstates the older behavior, and I know that the work-around is to trash the storyboards and rework the code. Or go back to Xcode 8.

I do hope they reinstate this!

- Jack

On Jun 7, 2017, at 10:09 AM, Jens Alfke <jens@mooseyard.com> wrote:

So, Xcode 9! Here are my first impressions after a few days of using the beta.

I’m very impressed so far. The new editor is excellent — it’s super smooth and fast, even on some huge source files I work with that were sluggish before. It also does away with a lot of glitchiness I’d been experiencing, like random scrolling to the wrong place. I’ve found and reported a few regressions, like inability to turn off search wraparound, and ‘Use Selection For Replace’ not working.

Refactoring C++ is huge for me, because currently most of the code I’m writing is C++ or Obj-C++. The new refactoring UI is also very nice.

I have mixed feelings about the new Command-click behavior. It’s great to be able to access refactoring from the pop-up, but it does add an extra click to just jumping to the definition. You can use Ctrl-Command-click to skip that step, but it takes some effort to retrain my fingers to do that!

The undefined-behavior sanitizer and improved address sanitizer have already caught a few bugs in my code, including a tricky one involving using a pointer to a member of a C++ object after that object had left scope and been destructed. I have no idea what magic it used to detect that! On the downside, the UB sanitizer often causes my target executable to lock up when it finds the first issue, but I can work around it by just stopping it and running again.

All in all, I recommend downloading and using it.

—Jens


Re: table view controlers and data populating

Taylor Arndt
 

Thanks, I really don't know what I'm doing it like I said and I am doing iOS app development. I will post to the other group next time, but like I said I really don't know what I'm doing and very new at this whole deal

Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 7, 2017, at 1:25 PM, Jens Alfke <jens@...> wrote:

Table views can definitely be tricky at first. But first, two things:

  • Questions about using frameworks like UIKit and AppKit are best posted on the ‘cocoa’ list. Following tradition, the ‘xcode’ list is about the Xcode IDE / compiler / tools themselves. Sorry if this sounds control-freaky, but in the past both lists have gotten busy and this helps to keep things focused.
  • When asking a Cocoa question make sure it’s clear what platform you’re asking about: from your post I can’t tell whether you’re making a Mac or iOS app, and table views work differently on each platform.

So could you repost on the cocoa list and put either UITableView or NSTableView in the subject? Thanks from your neighborhood control freak ;)

—Jens


Re: table view controlers and data populating

Quincey Morris
 

On Jun 7, 2017, at 12:25 , Taylor Arndt <taylorarndt99@...> wrote:

I really don't know what I'm doing it like I said and I am doing iOS app development.

You’re not going to get a good answer here, because table views are very flexible, and have a long conceptual history. No one can be specific without kinda being “right there” looking over your shoulder. All we can do is a bit of hand-waving.

Instead, I recommend you study this document:


Even though it’s years old, it explains the basic concepts. You should literally work through the document from beginning to end. For things that you don’t need (for example, custom section headers and footers, maybe) you should still read at least once, so that the ideas can take hold, even if you have to look them up again later.

The other thing you should do is to study some sample apps. Not so much a big “table view everything demo” app, but something that uses a table view in a straightforward way. That gives a reference point for what to put where, and a place to try changing things.


Re: table view controlers and data populating

bartramf@...
 

Just wanted to thank Jens for making the effort to set these group up.




--
-- 
Frederick "Rick" Bartram
bartramf@acm.org ( bartramf@acm.org )
PGP key id: 0x4193BED2  key server: http://pgp.mit.edu


Re: table view controlers and data populating

Peter Hudson
 

If you want the answer to this - and many other questions on iOS dev, I suggest you lack at Paul Hudsons books on. www.hackingwithswift.com

You will save yourself a lot of time. 

Peter

On 7 Jun 2017, at 21:35, Quincey Morris <quinceymorris@...> wrote:

On Jun 7, 2017, at 12:25 , Taylor Arndt <taylorarndt99@...> wrote:

I really don't know what I'm doing it like I said and I am doing iOS app development.

You’re not going to get a good answer here, because table views are very flexible, and have a long conceptual history. No one can be specific without kinda being “right there” looking over your shoulder. All we can do is a bit of hand-waving.

Instead, I recommend you study this document:


Even though it’s years old, it explains the basic concepts. You should literally work through the document from beginning to end. For things that you don’t need (for example, custom section headers and footers, maybe) you should still read at least once, so that the ideas can take hold, even if you have to look them up again later.

The other thing you should do is to study some sample apps. Not so much a big “table view everything demo” app, but something that uses a table view in a straightforward way. That gives a reference point for what to put where, and a place to try changing things.


Re: Xcode 9 impressions

 


On Jun 7, 2017, at 11:35 AM, Jack Brindle <jackbrindle@...> wrote:

So far Xcode 9 has one major flaw that must be corrected - for mac OS apps, it appears that Apple has removed the ability to create projects with xibs, instead only allowing Storyboards.

Yikes. I haven’t done much UI-level development in recent years, and I never really figured out storyboards so I still use xibs. Guess it’s time to learn.

I guess you could work around this by copying an existing project and removing all the existing sources and resources, to use it as a template to start from.

—Jens


Re: Xcode 9 impressions

Taylor Arndt
 

When do you think the Xcode nine beta will come out for people who are not in the developer program?

Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 7, 2017, at 7:29 PM, Jens Alfke <jens@...> wrote:


On Jun 7, 2017, at 11:35 AM, Jack Brindle <jackbrindle@...> wrote:

So far Xcode 9 has one major flaw that must be corrected - for mac OS apps, it appears that Apple has removed the ability to create projects with xibs, instead only allowing Storyboards.

Yikes. I haven’t done much UI-level development in recent years, and I never really figured out storyboards so I still use xibs. Guess it’s time to learn.

I guess you could work around this by copying an existing project and removing all the existing sources and resources, to use it as a template to start from.

—Jens


Re: table view controlers and data populating

Taylor Arndt
 

Thanks all, and I am actually learning some things. So I'm hoping to have my first App released by the end of the summer, as I will be 18.

Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 7, 2017, at 4:42 PM, Peter Hudson <Peter.hudson@...> wrote:

If you want the answer to this - and many other questions on iOS dev, I suggest you lack at Paul Hudsons books on. www.hackingwithswift.com

You will save yourself a lot of time. 

Peter

On 7 Jun 2017, at 21:35, Quincey Morris <quinceymorris@...> wrote:

On Jun 7, 2017, at 12:25 , Taylor Arndt <taylorarndt99@...> wrote:

I really don't know what I'm doing it like I said and I am doing iOS app development.

You’re not going to get a good answer here, because table views are very flexible, and have a long conceptual history. No one can be specific without kinda being “right there” looking over your shoulder. All we can do is a bit of hand-waving.

Instead, I recommend you study this document:


Even though it’s years old, it explains the basic concepts. You should literally work through the document from beginning to end. For things that you don’t need (for example, custom section headers and footers, maybe) you should still read at least once, so that the ideas can take hold, even if you have to look them up again later.

The other thing you should do is to study some sample apps. Not so much a big “table view everything demo” app, but something that uses a table view in a straightforward way. That gives a reference point for what to put where, and a place to try changing things.


Re: Xcode 9 impressions

 


On Jun 7, 2017, at 7:06 PM, Taylor Arndt <taylorarndt99@...> wrote:

When do you think the Xcode nine beta will come out for people who are not in the developer program?

I don’t think betas of Xcode are released outside the developer program; you’ll probably have to wait for the final release, circa September.

—Jens


Re: Xcode 9 impressions

Jeremy Hughes
 

Have they actually removed the xib options from the New File dialog?

If not, you can just delete the storyboard and create some xib files.

Jeremy

--

On 8 Jun 2017, at 00:29, Jens Alfke <jens@mooseyard.com> wrote:


On Jun 7, 2017, at 11:35 AM, Jack Brindle <jackbrindle@me.com> wrote:

So far Xcode 9 has one major flaw that must be corrected - for mac OS apps, it appears that Apple has removed the ability to create projects with xibs, instead only allowing Storyboards.
Yikes. I haven’t done much UI-level development in recent years, and I never really figured out storyboards so I still use xibs. Guess it’s time to learn.

I guess you could work around this by copying an existing project and removing all the existing sources and resources, to use it as a template to start from.

—Jens


Re: Xcode 9 impressions

David Delmonte
 

I’m running Xcode 9, but on Sierra. The XIB option is there when I create a new View Controller.

On Jun 8, 2017, at 12:36, Jeremy Hughes <moon.rabbit@virginmedia.com> wrote:

Have they actually removed the xib options from the New File dialog?

If not, you can just delete the storyboard and create some xib files.

Jeremy

--

On 8 Jun 2017, at 00:29, Jens Alfke <jens@mooseyard.com> wrote:


On Jun 7, 2017, at 11:35 AM, Jack Brindle <jackbrindle@me.com> wrote:

So far Xcode 9 has one major flaw that must be corrected - for mac OS apps, it appears that Apple has removed the ability to create projects with xibs, instead only allowing Storyboards.
Yikes. I haven’t done much UI-level development in recent years, and I never really figured out storyboards so I still use xibs. Guess it’s time to learn.

I guess you could work around this by copying an existing project and removing all the existing sources and resources, to use it as a template to start from.

—Jens



App Transport Layer and Exceptions

2551phil
 

I’m making my first venture into submitting an app for distribution via the macOS App Store.

In my non-app store distributed apps, I have a call to a file located on my Amazon AWS repository which provides data the app needs (the data is changeable on a daily basis, so can’t be hardwired into the app). For some reason Amazon AWS won’t pass ATL (specifically, I have to add the NSExceptionRequiresForwardSecrecy key to get the url past ATL).

My (primary) question is: does anyone here know if exceptions are acceptable for App Store submission, or is ATL strictly enforced?

If the latter, a subsequent question is does anyone else here use calls to Amazon AWS within an App Store app and know how to deal with it? I don’t really understand why AWS doesn’t / can’t meet the requirements of ATL, or maybe I just need to fiddle with “something” in the settings for the AWS repository…?


TIA


Phil
@sqwarq

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