Date   

Re: Automatically running a script when a specific Xcode WS is loaded?p

 


On Jul 10, 2017, at 7:20 PM, Peter Teeson <peter.teeson@...> wrote:

By workspace global I mean it's like an environment variable 
that only exists in the workspace name space and
(a) while Xcode is launched and 
(b) is only set when a WS is loaded.
Thus all scripts, source code, and documents, etc could reference it.

No, there’s no such thing as that.

As to having two folders of the same repo one could have different checkout folder 
names but the same content -at least in svn. 
I use git myself but haven’t looked if that’s so in it.

I don’t think you understood my point. `mdfind kind:folder “MyFooBarWS”` doesn’t work if there are multiple folders named “MyFooBarWS”, since you don’t know which one it will return. So your script would have a 50/50 chance of setting the wrong path.

If you describe the actual problem you’re trying to solve, maybe we can suggest ways to solve it.

—Jens


Re: Automatically running a script when a specific Xcode WS is loaded?p

Peter Teeson
 

Thanks for your reply. No it’s not a build variable. 
By workspace global I mean it's like an environment variable 
that only exists in the workspace name space and
(a) while Xcode is launched and 
(b) is only set when a WS is loaded.

Thus all scripts, source code, and documents, etc could reference it.
I’m still searching for doc’n on whether Xcode can take params on launching.

As to having two folders of the same repo one could have different checkout folder 
names but the same content -at least in svn. 
I use git myself but haven’t looked if that’s so in it.


Peter

On Jul 10, 2017, at 2:12 PM, Jens Alfke <jens@...> wrote:


On Jul 10, 2017, at 10:36 AM, Peter Teeson <peter.teeson@...> wrote:

When Xcode loads MyFooBarWS.xcworkpace I want to 
automatically set a workspace global of the path to the WS. 

I’m not sure what you mean by a workspace global. Do you mean a build variable? If so, why not just use $(SRCROOT)?

MyFooBarWS=$(mdfind kind:folder “MyFooBarWS”) gives me what I want.

…until you have two folders named “MyFooBarWS”. 😱 (It can happen. I’ve sometimes checked out two copies of a Git repo, if I need to work on two branches at the same time.)

—Jens


Re: Automatically running a script when a specific Xcode WS is loaded?p

 


On Jul 10, 2017, at 10:36 AM, Peter Teeson <peter.teeson@...> wrote:

When Xcode loads MyFooBarWS.xcworkpace I want to 
automatically set a workspace global of the path to the WS. 

I’m not sure what you mean by a workspace global. Do you mean a build variable? If so, why not just use $(SRCROOT)?

MyFooBarWS=$(mdfind kind:folder “MyFooBarWS”) gives me what I want.

…until you have two folders named “MyFooBarWS”. 😱 (It can happen. I’ve sometimes checked out two copies of a Git repo, if I need to work on two branches at the same time.)

—Jens


Automatically running a script when a specific Xcode WS is loaded?p

Peter Teeson
 

I have an Xcode WS that will be shared with others.
They can place it wherever they prefer in their HDD/SDD hierarchy.

When Xcode loads MyFooBarWS.xcworkpace I want to 
automatically set a workspace global of the path to the WS. 

MyFooBarWS=$(mdfind kind:folder “MyFooBarWS”) gives me what I want.

But how do I get Xcode to automatically execute that on loading the WS?

( I don’t really want to add it to my PATH or Profile… 
Just make it available only when the WS is loaded)

TKS

Peter



Scroll Views in IB

Dave
 

Hi,

A quick question about Scroll Views in XCode/IB.

I add a Scroll View of 216 x 25, set to to Scroll in H only and then set constraints to the top, bottom, left and right of the view. If I now add 9 x 24 x 24 images it occupies the same rectangle as the Scroll View. in IB if I now add a 10th image of 24 x 24, should it scroll?

In the final App the Scroll View will be empty and the App will add to it over time. I want to to show 9 at any one time, is this the way to do it?

I saw somewhere that you should stack view that contains the images put that into a Scroll View? Not sure if I should do that?

Does it work the same way without Auto Layout?

All the Best
Dave


Re: Which list should I be posting to?

Alex Zavatone
 

We should just start posting to the xcode@apple-dev.groups.io list.


Let’s spend some time getting used to this list being our replacement for Apple’s old useful and beloved Xcode list.

- Alex Zavatone



On Jun 30, 2017, at 3:27 PM, Dave <dave@...> wrote:

Hi,

I thought that the XCode List was going away and there was a new one. I’m not seeing many messages to the new one, so which one do I post to? 


Cheers
Dave



Re: Which list should I be posting to?

 


On Jun 30, 2017, at 1:27 PM, Dave <dave@...> wrote:

I thought that the XCode List was going away and there was a new one. I’m not seeing many messages to the new one, so which one do I post to? 

I think people are still posting to the Apple list instead, out of inertia, and due to network effects (i.e. that’s where most of the eyeballs still are.) But this list is running, and currently has 126 members, so feel free to post.

—Jens

PS: Any member's first post will go into the moderation queue until I approve it; after that you can post freely. I’ve found from other groups I run that this is a very good way to eliminate spam, with minimal inconvenience. I try to moderate messages quickly, but I pre-apologize if it sometimes takes a few hours, especially if it’s late at night (US Pacific time, GMT-8.)


Which list should I be posting to?

Dave
 

Hi,

I thought that the XCode List was going away and there was a new one. I’m not seeing many messages to the new one, so which one do I post to? 


Cheers
Dave


Re: App Transport Layer and Exceptions

2551phil
 

Thanks for that, Alex. That’s a bit more reassuring.

I guess the proof is in the pudding. I’ll just have to try it and see!


Best


Phil
@sqwarq

On 19 Jun 2017, at 22:08, Alexander von Below <below@mac.com> wrote:

Oh, let Quinn The Eskimo answer that:

"What has changed is that App Review will require “reasonable justification” for most ATS exceptions. The goal here is to flush out those folks who, when ATS was first released, simply turned it off globally and moved on. That will no longer be allowed.“
(From: https://forums.developer.apple.com/thread/48979)

You are not disabling ATS, and accessing AWS will surely be a very reasonable justification — if Apple even wants one.

HTH

Alex


Am 19.06.2017 um 14:41 schrieb 2551phil <2551phil@gmail.com>:

Thanks, Alex, but I’m not really sure that’s relevant to my specific questions.

I already know how to configure the Info.plist. As I said, I’ve had the NSException for ATL for a while. My question was whether exceptions are allowed in the macOS App Store **now**.

The document you referenced was related to iOS 9, which is a different platform and store, and is nearly two years old.

I can well believe that Apple might have had a more lenient policy when ATL was introduced than they might do now.


Best


Phil
@sqwarq


On 19 Jun 2017, at 14:46, Alexander von Below <below@mac.com> wrote:

Hello,

a quick google search pulled up this from the „AWS Mobile Blog“: https://aws.amazon.com/de/blogs/mobile/preparing-your-apps-for-ios-9/

I am as surprised as you that AWS does not meet the ATL criteria.

To find out, run /usr/bin/nscurl --ats-diagnostics $yoururlgoeshere

HTH

Alex

Am 19.06.2017 um 07:48 schrieb 2551phil <2551phil@gmail.com>:

I’m making my first venture into submitting an app for distribution via the macOS App Store.

In my non-app store distributed apps, I have a call to a file located on my Amazon AWS repository which provides data the app needs (the data is changeable on a daily basis, so can’t be hardwired into the app). For some reason Amazon AWS won’t pass ATL (specifically, I have to add the NSExceptionRequiresForwardSecrecy key to get the url past ATL).

My (primary) question is: does anyone here know if exceptions are acceptable for App Store submission, or is ATL strictly enforced?

If the latter, a subsequent question is does anyone else here use calls to Amazon AWS within an App Store app and know how to deal with it? I don’t really understand why AWS doesn’t / can’t meet the requirements of ATL, or maybe I just need to fiddle with “something” in the settings for the AWS repository…?


TIA


Phil
@sqwarq









Re: App Transport Layer and Exceptions

Alexander von Below
 

Oh, let Quinn The Eskimo answer that:

"What has changed is that App Review will require “reasonable justification” for most ATS exceptions. The goal here is to flush out those folks who, when ATS was first released, simply turned it off globally and moved on. That will no longer be allowed.“
(From: https://forums.developer.apple.com/thread/48979)

You are not disabling ATS, and accessing AWS will surely be a very reasonable justification — if Apple even wants one.

HTH

Alex

Am 19.06.2017 um 14:41 schrieb 2551phil <2551phil@gmail.com>:

Thanks, Alex, but I’m not really sure that’s relevant to my specific questions.

I already know how to configure the Info.plist. As I said, I’ve had the NSException for ATL for a while. My question was whether exceptions are allowed in the macOS App Store **now**.

The document you referenced was related to iOS 9, which is a different platform and store, and is nearly two years old.

I can well believe that Apple might have had a more lenient policy when ATL was introduced than they might do now.


Best


Phil
@sqwarq


On 19 Jun 2017, at 14:46, Alexander von Below <below@mac.com> wrote:

Hello,

a quick google search pulled up this from the „AWS Mobile Blog“: https://aws.amazon.com/de/blogs/mobile/preparing-your-apps-for-ios-9/

I am as surprised as you that AWS does not meet the ATL criteria.

To find out, run /usr/bin/nscurl --ats-diagnostics $yoururlgoeshere

HTH

Alex

Am 19.06.2017 um 07:48 schrieb 2551phil <2551phil@gmail.com>:

I’m making my first venture into submitting an app for distribution via the macOS App Store.

In my non-app store distributed apps, I have a call to a file located on my Amazon AWS repository which provides data the app needs (the data is changeable on a daily basis, so can’t be hardwired into the app). For some reason Amazon AWS won’t pass ATL (specifically, I have to add the NSExceptionRequiresForwardSecrecy key to get the url past ATL).

My (primary) question is: does anyone here know if exceptions are acceptable for App Store submission, or is ATL strictly enforced?

If the latter, a subsequent question is does anyone else here use calls to Amazon AWS within an App Store app and know how to deal with it? I don’t really understand why AWS doesn’t / can’t meet the requirements of ATL, or maybe I just need to fiddle with “something” in the settings for the AWS repository…?


TIA


Phil
@sqwarq








Re: App Transport Layer and Exceptions

2551phil
 

Thanks, Alex, but I’m not really sure that’s relevant to my specific questions.

I already know how to configure the Info.plist. As I said, I’ve had the NSException for ATL for a while. My question was whether exceptions are allowed in the macOS App Store **now**.

The document you referenced was related to iOS 9, which is a different platform and store, and is nearly two years old.

I can well believe that Apple might have had a more lenient policy when ATL was introduced than they might do now.


Best


Phil
@sqwarq

On 19 Jun 2017, at 14:46, Alexander von Below <below@mac.com> wrote:

Hello,

a quick google search pulled up this from the „AWS Mobile Blog“: https://aws.amazon.com/de/blogs/mobile/preparing-your-apps-for-ios-9/

I am as surprised as you that AWS does not meet the ATL criteria.

To find out, run /usr/bin/nscurl --ats-diagnostics $yoururlgoeshere

HTH

Alex

Am 19.06.2017 um 07:48 schrieb 2551phil <2551phil@gmail.com>:

I’m making my first venture into submitting an app for distribution via the macOS App Store.

In my non-app store distributed apps, I have a call to a file located on my Amazon AWS repository which provides data the app needs (the data is changeable on a daily basis, so can’t be hardwired into the app). For some reason Amazon AWS won’t pass ATL (specifically, I have to add the NSExceptionRequiresForwardSecrecy key to get the url past ATL).

My (primary) question is: does anyone here know if exceptions are acceptable for App Store submission, or is ATL strictly enforced?

If the latter, a subsequent question is does anyone else here use calls to Amazon AWS within an App Store app and know how to deal with it? I don’t really understand why AWS doesn’t / can’t meet the requirements of ATL, or maybe I just need to fiddle with “something” in the settings for the AWS repository…?


TIA


Phil
@sqwarq






Re: App Transport Layer and Exceptions

Alexander von Below
 

Hello,

a quick google search pulled up this from the „AWS Mobile Blog“: https://aws.amazon.com/de/blogs/mobile/preparing-your-apps-for-ios-9/

I am as surprised as you that AWS does not meet the ATL criteria.

To find out, run /usr/bin/nscurl --ats-diagnostics $yoururlgoeshere

HTH

Alex

Am 19.06.2017 um 07:48 schrieb 2551phil <2551phil@gmail.com>:

I’m making my first venture into submitting an app for distribution via the macOS App Store.

In my non-app store distributed apps, I have a call to a file located on my Amazon AWS repository which provides data the app needs (the data is changeable on a daily basis, so can’t be hardwired into the app). For some reason Amazon AWS won’t pass ATL (specifically, I have to add the NSExceptionRequiresForwardSecrecy key to get the url past ATL).

My (primary) question is: does anyone here know if exceptions are acceptable for App Store submission, or is ATL strictly enforced?

If the latter, a subsequent question is does anyone else here use calls to Amazon AWS within an App Store app and know how to deal with it? I don’t really understand why AWS doesn’t / can’t meet the requirements of ATL, or maybe I just need to fiddle with “something” in the settings for the AWS repository…?


TIA


Phil
@sqwarq





App Transport Layer and Exceptions

2551phil
 

I’m making my first venture into submitting an app for distribution via the macOS App Store.

In my non-app store distributed apps, I have a call to a file located on my Amazon AWS repository which provides data the app needs (the data is changeable on a daily basis, so can’t be hardwired into the app). For some reason Amazon AWS won’t pass ATL (specifically, I have to add the NSExceptionRequiresForwardSecrecy key to get the url past ATL).

My (primary) question is: does anyone here know if exceptions are acceptable for App Store submission, or is ATL strictly enforced?

If the latter, a subsequent question is does anyone else here use calls to Amazon AWS within an App Store app and know how to deal with it? I don’t really understand why AWS doesn’t / can’t meet the requirements of ATL, or maybe I just need to fiddle with “something” in the settings for the AWS repository…?


TIA


Phil
@sqwarq


Re: Xcode 9 impressions

David Delmonte
 

I’m running Xcode 9, but on Sierra. The XIB option is there when I create a new View Controller.

On Jun 8, 2017, at 12:36, Jeremy Hughes <moon.rabbit@virginmedia.com> wrote:

Have they actually removed the xib options from the New File dialog?

If not, you can just delete the storyboard and create some xib files.

Jeremy

--

On 8 Jun 2017, at 00:29, Jens Alfke <jens@mooseyard.com> wrote:


On Jun 7, 2017, at 11:35 AM, Jack Brindle <jackbrindle@me.com> wrote:

So far Xcode 9 has one major flaw that must be corrected - for mac OS apps, it appears that Apple has removed the ability to create projects with xibs, instead only allowing Storyboards.
Yikes. I haven’t done much UI-level development in recent years, and I never really figured out storyboards so I still use xibs. Guess it’s time to learn.

I guess you could work around this by copying an existing project and removing all the existing sources and resources, to use it as a template to start from.

—Jens



Re: Xcode 9 impressions

Jeremy Hughes
 

Have they actually removed the xib options from the New File dialog?

If not, you can just delete the storyboard and create some xib files.

Jeremy

--

On 8 Jun 2017, at 00:29, Jens Alfke <jens@mooseyard.com> wrote:


On Jun 7, 2017, at 11:35 AM, Jack Brindle <jackbrindle@me.com> wrote:

So far Xcode 9 has one major flaw that must be corrected - for mac OS apps, it appears that Apple has removed the ability to create projects with xibs, instead only allowing Storyboards.
Yikes. I haven’t done much UI-level development in recent years, and I never really figured out storyboards so I still use xibs. Guess it’s time to learn.

I guess you could work around this by copying an existing project and removing all the existing sources and resources, to use it as a template to start from.

—Jens


Re: Xcode 9 impressions

 


On Jun 7, 2017, at 7:06 PM, Taylor Arndt <taylorarndt99@...> wrote:

When do you think the Xcode nine beta will come out for people who are not in the developer program?

I don’t think betas of Xcode are released outside the developer program; you’ll probably have to wait for the final release, circa September.

—Jens


Re: table view controlers and data populating

Taylor Arndt
 

Thanks all, and I am actually learning some things. So I'm hoping to have my first App released by the end of the summer, as I will be 18.

Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 7, 2017, at 4:42 PM, Peter Hudson <Peter.hudson@...> wrote:

If you want the answer to this - and many other questions on iOS dev, I suggest you lack at Paul Hudsons books on. www.hackingwithswift.com

You will save yourself a lot of time. 

Peter

On 7 Jun 2017, at 21:35, Quincey Morris <quinceymorris@...> wrote:

On Jun 7, 2017, at 12:25 , Taylor Arndt <taylorarndt99@...> wrote:

I really don't know what I'm doing it like I said and I am doing iOS app development.

You’re not going to get a good answer here, because table views are very flexible, and have a long conceptual history. No one can be specific without kinda being “right there” looking over your shoulder. All we can do is a bit of hand-waving.

Instead, I recommend you study this document:


Even though it’s years old, it explains the basic concepts. You should literally work through the document from beginning to end. For things that you don’t need (for example, custom section headers and footers, maybe) you should still read at least once, so that the ideas can take hold, even if you have to look them up again later.

The other thing you should do is to study some sample apps. Not so much a big “table view everything demo” app, but something that uses a table view in a straightforward way. That gives a reference point for what to put where, and a place to try changing things.


Re: Xcode 9 impressions

Taylor Arndt
 

When do you think the Xcode nine beta will come out for people who are not in the developer program?

Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 7, 2017, at 7:29 PM, Jens Alfke <jens@...> wrote:


On Jun 7, 2017, at 11:35 AM, Jack Brindle <jackbrindle@...> wrote:

So far Xcode 9 has one major flaw that must be corrected - for mac OS apps, it appears that Apple has removed the ability to create projects with xibs, instead only allowing Storyboards.

Yikes. I haven’t done much UI-level development in recent years, and I never really figured out storyboards so I still use xibs. Guess it’s time to learn.

I guess you could work around this by copying an existing project and removing all the existing sources and resources, to use it as a template to start from.

—Jens


Re: Xcode 9 impressions

 


On Jun 7, 2017, at 11:35 AM, Jack Brindle <jackbrindle@...> wrote:

So far Xcode 9 has one major flaw that must be corrected - for mac OS apps, it appears that Apple has removed the ability to create projects with xibs, instead only allowing Storyboards.

Yikes. I haven’t done much UI-level development in recent years, and I never really figured out storyboards so I still use xibs. Guess it’s time to learn.

I guess you could work around this by copying an existing project and removing all the existing sources and resources, to use it as a template to start from.

—Jens


Re: table view controlers and data populating

Peter Hudson
 

If you want the answer to this - and many other questions on iOS dev, I suggest you lack at Paul Hudsons books on. www.hackingwithswift.com

You will save yourself a lot of time. 

Peter

On 7 Jun 2017, at 21:35, Quincey Morris <quinceymorris@...> wrote:

On Jun 7, 2017, at 12:25 , Taylor Arndt <taylorarndt99@...> wrote:

I really don't know what I'm doing it like I said and I am doing iOS app development.

You’re not going to get a good answer here, because table views are very flexible, and have a long conceptual history. No one can be specific without kinda being “right there” looking over your shoulder. All we can do is a bit of hand-waving.

Instead, I recommend you study this document:


Even though it’s years old, it explains the basic concepts. You should literally work through the document from beginning to end. For things that you don’t need (for example, custom section headers and footers, maybe) you should still read at least once, so that the ideas can take hold, even if you have to look them up again later.

The other thing you should do is to study some sample apps. Not so much a big “table view everything demo” app, but something that uses a table view in a straightforward way. That gives a reference point for what to put where, and a place to try changing things.

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